Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Kostika Spaho

Co-Founder and CTO, Ica & Kostika

Keynote: From Human Doings to Human Beings - Automation Used for Good

Time : 10:00 A.M to 10:40 AM

Biography:

I was born in paradise and I was raised by Gods. This lasted during the first 10 years then the lights went out. I’m talking about the country of Albania and my family, friends and everyone involved in the formation of my personality. I was born into a fruitful land where everything was once organic, life was a beautiful dream, and love, it was just abundant. It helped form a concrete core that would later withstand, a revolution, a Great Depression, a civil war-like situation and lots of crime and violence. No matter what happened, I always made time for art. Despite the shortage of paper, writing and coloring tools, or any artistic infrastructure, I drew on the ground with a stick, I sculpted out of the asphalt dripping on the sides of old brick buildings, created toys, insects and figurines out of electrical cables and studied the smallest details I could see on all live plants and animals I got my hands on. My family and I arrived in America in April of 1998, due to my mom winning the green card lottery. It was here when art flourished again for me. While in high school, my best friend got me my first mural. Later on I attended college and earned a Masters in Architecture. Then eager to work on cooler projects, I ended up 3D modeling the hottest 3D printed high heel, ‘Biomimicry Shoe’, in collaboration with Marieka Ratsma. This made me internet famous, opened many doors and I eventually found myself in New York City, living the life of a rockstar, which only lasted about eight months. Lets not forget Shapeways, today’s largest global 3D Printing service provider, and second home for me to experiment, collaborate and grow. Eventually my wife found me on LinkedIn to collaborate on her shoe designs. We ended up falling in love and here we are today, making the craziest, most futuristic shoes on the planet.   

Abstract:

When we look at one’s career progression today, it goes something like this. Find passion, master the skills needed to pursuit passion, learn through trial and error, perfect one’s skills, become aware of big ideas, proliferate ideas through leadership and make a global impact. In simpler words, do what you love and outsource what you don’t. This approach has led humanity towards ever evolving progress, prosperity and technological marvels. However, it still leaves humanity with winners and losers and we finally have the right tools to improve our story. Instead of doing what we love and outsourcing what we do not, we automate the undesirable. This approach leads us to the tipping point, the transition from type zero to type one civilization (see Kardashev scale), we are moving from human doing to human being. I will tell you a story, enriched with animated visuals from my experience in leading a half a million dollar private footwear and apparel company towards automation, by simplifying the product creation process into clean steps, rewritten as algorithms to be fed to machine learning mechanisms on phase one. Next, the machines will breed between digitally human created 3d CAD models, similar to how nature breeds us and everything alive. Finally, bring in artificial intelligence to bridge the gap between creator and benefactor (client) allowing everyone involved to seamlessly influence the product throughout its entire life-cycle.

 

Keynote Forum

Andrey Stepanov

Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Keynote: Porous Silicon and Germanium Layers with Silver Nanoparticles Formed by Ion Implantation

Time : 10:40 AM to 11:20 AM

Biography:

Since 1992, Dr. A. Stepanov is with Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. In 1997-1999, he was a Research Fellow at the Sussex University, UK (the Royal Society/NATO). From 1999 to 2003, A. Stepanov was a Research Fellow of the RWTH in Germany (the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation). During 2003-2004, he was granted by Lise Meitner Fellowship (Austrian Scientific Society) in Karl-Franzens-University in Graz. From 2004 to 2011, he was a Research Fellow in Laser Zentrum Hannover in Germany (DAAD, DFG and the AvH). In 2013, he was granted by the National Scholarship of the Slovak Republic. Main research subjects of his interest are Nanooptics, Nanoplasmonics, Nanophotonics, Metal nanoparticles, Nonlinear optics, Laser annealing and Ion implantation. He has more then 250 publications in periodic journals, 20 patents, more than 25 invited book chapters and 3 monographs. According of the ISI Web of Science database A. Stepanov has near 3000 citations in scientific publications and his Hirsch index is 32.

 

Abstract:

Experiments on the formation of nanoporous silicon and germanium layers with silver nanoparticles by low-energy high-dose ion implantation are observed. For this task Ag+-ion implantation into monocrystalline silicon and germanium substrates at energy 30, keV with doses from 7.5·1016 to 1.5·1017 ion/cm2 was realized. Surface nanoporous semiconductor structures were studied by scanning electron microscopy, imaging, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It is demonstrated that nanoporous silicon and germanium with silver nanoparticles could be fabricated by Ag-ion implantation. The average sizes of porous holes and thickness of walls between porous in silicon are about 110-130 and 30-60 nm, respectively. Silver nanoparticles are synthesized and uniformly distributed over the silicon surface. In germanium, regular holes were not observed. A porous amorphous germanium layer of a spongy structure consisting of a network of intersecting nanofibers with an average diameter of ~10‒20 nm is formed. At the ends of the nanofibers, the formation of Ag nanoparticles is detected. It is found that the formation of pores during implantation with Ag+ ions is accompanied by the effective spraying of the silicon and germanium surface. Thus, ion implantation is suggested for the industry to be used for a formation of nanoporous semiconductor thin layers containing silver nanoparticles, which could be easily combined with the crystalline substrates for various applications such as, for example, solar cell. This study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, project no. 17-12-01176.    .

 

  • Classification of Smart Materials |Smart Structures and Materials | Smart Materials using Nano-technology | Robotics and Future | Shape Memory Alloys | Automation and Impact
Location: Berlin

Session Introduction

Jalal Akbari

University of Malayer, Iran

Title: Multiple damage detection in frames using wavelet transforms
Speaker
Biography:

Jalal is Assistant Professor of civil engineering at Malayer University from September 2008. He spent about one-year (2006-2007) as a research scholar at University of Florida (UF) in USA. He graduated with Ph.D. from Tarbait Modares University (TMU) in 2008 in Tehran. He received M.Sc degree in the civil engineering field (IUST) in 2002 in Tehran. He got B.Sc degree in the civil engineering field from Bu-Ali Sina University in 1999 in Hamedan.

Abstract:

Wavelet transforms are convenient tools in the structural health monitoring and damage detection fields. However, these methods have encountered some limitations in practical usage. Thus, signal energy analysis was also used as an alternative technique for damage detection. In this research, firstly, comparison between the wavelet and signal energy methods for frame type structures with different support conditions and multiple damage scenarios has been conducted. Then, Discrete Wavelet transforms (DWT) and Teager energy operator (TEO) have been applied on the curvature of mode shapes of the beams, and the locations of the damages have been identified. The results show that in compare with discrete wavelet transform signal energy operator has preference. This superiority in detecting the damages, especially near the supports of the beam, is obvious, and contains enough sensitivities in low damage intensities. Additionally, the damage detection in the cases that the response data is noisy has been investigated. For this purpose, by adding low intensity noises to the curvature of the mode shapes, the abilities of mentioned methods have been evaluated. The results indicate that each method is not individually efficient in recognizing damages in noisy condition, but the combination of them under noisy conditions is more reliable.

Speaker
Biography:

Wojciech Piotr Bula graduated in electrical engineering from Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland in 2003, and obtained his Ph.D. from University of Twente, The Netherlands in 2009. He has been involved in research of micro- and nanotechnology for the exploration of new lab-on-a-chip systems with a special focus on silicon-glass microreactor chips for liquid phase chemistry, artificial glands for infochemical system and environmental monitoring. His research activity and interests focus on the synergy of micro- and nanotechnology, biology, chemistry, computer science and rapid prototyping. From 2011 he works in Japan (Hiroshima University, The University of Tokyo) and advocates for using new rapid prototyping techniques to decrease development costs and to increase the proliferation of affordable microfluidic devices. He is a co-founder of Bisu, a non-medical diagnostics start-up focused on bringing microfluidic systems for mass market.

Abstract:

Terry et al.’s publication [1] of 1979, featuring an integrated gas chromatograph, laid the foundations of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technology, and the subsequent advancement of micromachining techniques and Deep Reactive Ion Etching in particular have opened up new research opportunities. Silicon became the material of choice for more than two decades. Its unique properties allowed for fabrication of sub-micrometer features. The author has utilized silicon-glass micromachining to develop systems such as chromatography capillary columns, thermoconductivity gas detectors, and sample injector of integrated gas chromatograph. The ability to manipulate liquid at microscale was recognized as a powerful tool to perform chemical reactions under conditions that cannot be achieved at lab-scale. Multiline microreactors have been manufactured which have surfaces modified by immobilized enzymes or catalysts, and with integrated desorption/ionization on silicon functionality for mass spectrometry [2]. The dawn of nanofabrication techniques enabled the development of (i) a nano-machined artificial gland for the dissipation of sex pheromones originating from Spodoptera littoralis as a biomimetic infochemical communication system [3], and (ii) an evaporative sample concentrator featuring a perforated membrane of 180nm thickness for a water quality monitoring system [4]. Despite all the benefits of silicon micromachining, the proliferation of this technology has been limited by its high unit cost and fabrication labor requirements. While attempts have been made to replace silicon with polymers such as PDMS, cyclic olefin copolymer, and thermoplastics, many unsolved issues remained. The introduction of 3D-printing techniques gave momentum to the microfluidics field and shifted the design paradigm. A sample concentration system based on a 3D-printed microfluidic circuit board was created [5] in which some microfluidic components were manufactured by rapid prototyping. Secondly, the author will exhibit a fully 3D-printed water quality monitoring system [6] and will discuss the pros and cons of 3D-printing in relation to alternative rapid prototyping techniques.

Speaker
Biography:

Bamidele Lawrence Bayode is currently doing his PhD degree at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. His field of study includes the spark plasma sintering (SPS) fabrication, characterization and optimization of functional properties of Ti-based high temperature shape memory alloys. The SPS is a relatively novel fabrication technique for fabrication of novel advanced materials with tailor made properties, and since the development of Ti-based shape memory alloys is still on the rise, he has therefore decided to employ the use of the novel SPS technique to investigate the various technical possibilities that Ti-Ta and Ti-Zr based shape memory alloys possess.
 

Abstract:

Ti-Ta and Ti-Zr alloys have been identified to possess capabilities to meet the demand for light weight, commercially friendly and functionally viable high temperature shape memory applications in the aerospace industries. Characterization is at the core of understanding the phenomenological relationship between the processing method and the final materials properties. In contrast to the preponderance of reported work on the characterization of shape memory alloys fabricated from conventional techniques, not much work involving the uses of spark plasma sintering is available. In this study, Ti-30Ta and Ti-30Zr based alloys have been fabricated from elemental powders, using spark plasma sintering under varying process parameters including: sintering time, sintering pressure and powder formulations. As sintered powders were characterized for their relative density, and indentation microhardness using Archimedes buoyancy method and Vickers indentation techniques respectively. Metallographically prepared specimens were subjected to microstructural and chemical analyses using Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) respectively. Crystallographic properties were also determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The thermal properties of the sintered alloys were also determined using laser flash analyses and differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructural results showed improved twinned martensite plate formation with increase in at%Zr content as shown in Fig 1. Furthermore, Ta was found to stabilize beta phase in Ti while the Zr stabilize the alpha phase. Almost full densification was achieved with increase in the Zr content.

Speaker
Biography:

Juan Carlos is a passionate engineer who has +5 years of experience in additive manufacturing and 11 years as a mechanical engineer. His experience involves R&D of additive manufacturing processes and product design in metal 3D printers, stereolithography and most recently on DLP printers . On the research area, he has developed and tested different metal alloys to allow them to be compatible and achieve required mechanical and metallurgical properties using direct metal deposition. On DLP printers he is currently testing different resins to achieve required mechanical properties.  He earned the degree of Master in Science from the University of Manchester in Advanced Manufacturing Technology and Systems Management in 2011, with a dissertation titled “Low power wire feeding laser additive manufacture. In 2006, he graduated from a B.S. in Mechanical engineering with a minor in electrical engineering from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education.
 

Abstract:

As any other manufacturing technology that transforms a raw material into a final product, additive manufacturing technologies requires energy sources and materials usage that will define how efficient their process can be. This research is meant to give an approach on the efficiency of major production additive manufacturing technologies with an overview in hardware, material consumption and 3D products. These major production technologies are powder beds (metals and plastics), photopolimerization (SLA and DLP) and direct energy deposition (metals). 
 

Speaker
Biography:

Miss Xenia Mutter is a third year Ph.D. student at the University of Leeds, School of Design as part of the Technical Textile Research Group. She has her expertise in textiles, having completed her B.Eng. degree in Textile Engineering & Management at Saxion University of applied sciences in the Netherlands and her MSc degree in Advanced Textiles at the University of Leeds. She is currently working on a project investigating the development of a durable and ‘degradable’ binder for the coloration of cotton (-based) materials in order to facilitate subsequent recycling processes.

Abstract:

The common requirement for coloured textile garments is to have a high level of colour fastness for durability and a long garment lifetime. However, based on a consumer research by WRAP in 2016 the average lifetime of clothing was estimated to be only 3.3 years before the products are discarded or passed on.1 Discarded garments, also labelled as post-consumer waste, are generally reused, recycled, incinerated or put into landfill. Waste textiles in landfill could result in the production of leachate, potentially polluting ground- and surface water and incineration of textile waste for energy recovery generates ash and toxic gases.2, 3 Reuse or recycling of textile waste is suggested to be the better alternative as it could reduce waste and simultaneously prevent the production of more waste. Current recycling limitations include the dyestuff content of textile waste possibly inhibiting chemical recycling.4 There is clear need to investigate the removal and potential recovery of dyestuff from waste garments, to accommodate the reuse of the fibres. The main aim of the research is to use natural resources for the production of a binder for the coloration of cotton via ink jet printing. This binder is ideally relatively easy removable using benign chemistry without affecting the colour quality during the garments’ lifetime.The work described comprises initial experiments using polyamideamine epichlorohydrin (PAE) resin as a starting material for the innovative production of a binder.  PAE is generally used as a wet-strength agent in the paper industry and some research has been done on the interaction between PAE and cellulose.5, 6 The binder material is applied to cotton fabrics and characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.    

Speaker
Biography:

Yashfeen Khan is a doctoral student under the supervision of Professor Anees Ahmad in the PhD program, Nanoscale Material Science, Department of Chemistry at Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. India. Her main research interest centers around Carbon-dots and the development of carbon nanotubes based new nano-composites, to characterize the synthesized nano-composites by SEM, TEM, AFM, NMR, FTIR, RAMAN, XRD and TGA-DTA and various other techniques. Also, to figure-out the un-reported future applications of the synthesized materials in the areas: reinforcement, sensing(chemical and biological), cytotoxicity and cell line culture, anti-bacterial, optical activity, super-capacitance ability. She has been an  Active Member of renouned organizations: ‘’ CASFGS’’(Protection of Sexual Harassment Society), AMU, Aligarh, “ECO CLUB”, AMU , Aligarh. Active Member of Drug society “Registered as a charity by GOVT. of UP, Regd no. 1817 and Soch Beyond Imagination, AMU, Aligarh.

Abstract:

In the last few decades, nano-composites have been the topic of interest. Carbon-nanotubes are of significant scientific importance due to their remarkable properties in almost every field, be it electronic, mechanical, thermoplastic, optical, electrical, biological, and environmental .The field of material science is currently undergoing a shift from developing traditional materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers and composites to a more revolutionary trend of developing nanostructures, which are functionalized, self-assisting and occasionally even self-healing. Albeit, these advances are potentially game-changing, excitement must be tempered somewhat as several bottlenecks exist.

Nitric and Sulphuric acid(1:3 ratio) treated or functionalized MWCNT(A-CNT) were ultra-sonicated with PANI and ZrMo to obtain a ternary nano composite  i.e.CNT/PANI/ZrMo[1][2]. Inorganic part i.e.. Zirconium Molybdate ion-exchanger is prepared by combining Ammonium Molybdate with Zirconium oxychloride [3]. Since, the composite formed is ternary, PANI, the third component is added in all the three samples and in-situ polymerisation occurs . KPS or APS is used as polymerisation initiator or oxidising agent[4][5]. Three composite sample prepared, one is ZrMo/PANI, the second one is ZrMo/PANI /(.25g)MWCNT and the third one ZrMo/PANI/(.75g)MWCNT. These samples are properly dispersed using ultra-sonicator and centrifuged for proper separation in the presence of SDS/DBSA/CTAB which acts as a surfactant. The composite when underwent various studies showed enhanced thermal conductivities, photocatalytic activity, antibacterial and anti-cancer properties as well [6][7][8][9]. TEM and SEM analysis defined the morphology and excellent dispersion of CNTs in the composite where CNT appears as an axis over which PANI is surrounded like a uniform layer and ZrMo is filled in the inner cavities both giving backbone to the nano composite[10]

Speaker
Biography:

I am currently pursuing my masters in product refinement at Hochschule Kaiserslautern. I am interested in automobiles, sustainability and future transformations which are happening rapidly. Currently at our University, I am researching on bio based composites for various applications in electro mobility. As a science student, it’s my duty to be a part of this transformation and leave a sustainable environment for future generations.

Abstract:

The demand for renewable energy is rising due to the environmental concerns and higher energy demands or perhaps for economical energy production*. However, due to fluctuating energy output, renewables require some source to store energy and battery technology is found to be the considerable. The current batteries are based on Lithium-ion and though the cost of these batteries is falling drastically, they are still considered as expensive to use in large scale. The battery technology is increasingly interested in recent times and enormous amount of money and research is going on to develop safe and cost-effective alternatives. Scientists around the world are experimenting with various materials such as metals, ceramics and incorporating organic active materials into polymers and tuning them to bring desired results. The purpose of my talk is to share my literature research on the possibilities and the potential materials for the future batteries. The beauty of material science is the possibility of manipulating and altering materials to the needs, such advancements are promising to bring the better battery technologies that makes sustainability a reality

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Daniela Wittmann

German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Germany

Keynote: Smart Clothing: Construction kit for multifunctional textileadapted electronic microsystems

Time : 10:00 A.M to 10:40 AM

Biography:

Daniela Wittmann has expertise in the field of textile and clothing technology with a focus on Smart Textiles. Her current work combines the industrial background of garment technology with the participative user-oriented knowledge from previous design-oriented projects at the Design Research Lab (University of the Arts Berlin) and the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (Interactive Textiles). In various interdisciplinary projects during the last years in the field of Smart Textiles, she was able to gain her in-depth expertise. She focuses on participative methods and design methods for the conception of use cases for wearables and processing of intelligent textile demonstrators.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Since the development of conductive thread material the processing according to classic industrial textile and clothing manufacturing techniques has been possible. However, there are weak points such as the connection of the conductive thread with the electronic components. (1) Until now, very different techniques have been used to process textile circuits and to combine hard components with the flexible textile - often also from the classical craft. These prove to be neither economical nor reliable. However, this reliability plays a major role in the user acceptance of wearables. In addition, wearables often do not meet aesthetic requirements of the user. (2) With the acquisition of information about the user the acceptance can be increased. (3) Methodology and results: On the basis of an exemplary scenario in the potential medical field of application, the research area of interactive textiles at the DFKI uses participative methods to ensure usability and to determine the technical system requirements. To solve the problem, a modular system is being developed in the BMBF funding project. This makes it possible to process the textile circuit on an industrial scale without purchasing new machines or acquiring additional special know-how. The problem of break resistance of the electrical conducting paths is solved by the embroidery process, which at the same time offers reliable contacting of the components. In order to allow many variations in the design and thus a multitude of applications, an interposer is developed that can accommodate various electronic components by means of a click system. In cooperation with the project partners Bosch, TITV Greiz, WESKO, Smart-Battery-Solutions and KUZ Leipzig, reduction of production costs, reliability of the system and high user acceptance are achieved

Keynote Forum

Dr Abdennacer Benali

Institute Microelectronic Materials and Nanosciences of Provence

Keynote: Complex dewetting of ultrathin silicon films for large-scale nanoarchitectures

Time : 10:40 AM to 11:20 AM

Biography:

Dr Abdennacer Benali has his expertise in Molecular Beam Epitaxy for both III-V and IV-IV semiconductors. He worked on III-V nanowires for photovoltaics where he acquired a strong knowledge in the material elaboration field. He also worked on the dewetting of Si and SiGe layers on SOI substrates. He made strong collaboration with laboratories all over Europe during his different projects.

Abstract:

Silicon-based nanocrystals represent a promising resource both for next generation electronic devices and for nano-photonics applications but require precise size, shape and position control [1,2]. However owing to their large surface-area-to-volume ratio, thin semiconductor solid films are often unstable upon annealing. Under the action of surface diffusion the film breaks eventually forming isolated islands. This is one of the main factors impeding the use of ultra-thin silicon films on insulators (UT-SOI) for the further miniaturization of electronic components. Here, with an e-beam lithographic method, we demonstrate the ultimate control of UT-SOI dewetting for the precise formation of complex nano-architectures featuring extremely reduced fluctuations of size, shape and positioning (a few %) over hundreds of repetitions and on large scales [3,4]. The solid state dewetting initiated at the edges of the patterns controllably creates the ordering of nanocrystals (NCs) with ad hoc placement and periodicity [5,6]. The NC size is tuned by varying the nominal thickness of the film while their position results from the association of film retraction from the edges of the lay out and Rayleigh-like instability. Islands formation, organization, positioning and composition are studied by dark-field, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (Figure 1). Predictive phase-field simulations of the mass transport mechanism, assess the dominant role of surface diffusion providing a tool for further engineering this hybrid top-down/bottom-up self-assembly method (Figure 2). We also investigate the influence of adding a Ge flux during the dewetting. Finally, we show the feasibility to perform ultra-long Si nanowires on SiO2 and also core-shell structures by adding SiGe fluxes with different compositions.