Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Biography:

Wojciech Piotr Bula graduated in electrical engineering from Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland in 2003, and obtained his Ph.D. from University of Twente, The Netherlands in 2009. He has been involved in research of micro- and nanotechnology for the exploration of new lab-on-a-chip systems with a special focus on silicon-glass microreactor chips for liquid phase chemistry, artificial glands for infochemical system and environmental monitoring. His research activity and interests focus on the synergy of micro- and nanotechnology, biology, chemistry, computer science and rapid prototyping. From 2011 he works in Japan (Hiroshima University, The University of Tokyo) and advocates for using new rapid prototyping techniques to decrease development costs and to increase the proliferation of affordable microfluidic devices. He is a co-founder of Bisu, a non-medical diagnostics start-up focused on bringing microfluidic systems for mass market.

Abstract:

Terry et al.’s publication [1] of 1979, featuring an integrated gas chromatograph, laid the foundations of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technology, and the subsequent advancement of micromachining techniques and Deep Reactive Ion Etching in particular have opened up new research opportunities. Silicon became the material of choice for more than two decades. Its unique properties allowed for fabrication of sub-micrometer features. The author has utilized silicon-glass micromachining to develop systems such as chromatography capillary columns, thermoconductivity gas detectors, and sample injector of integrated gas chromatograph. The ability to manipulate liquid at microscale was recognized as a powerful tool to perform chemical reactions under conditions that cannot be achieved at lab-scale. Multiline microreactors have been manufactured which have surfaces modified by immobilized enzymes or catalysts, and with integrated desorption/ionization on silicon functionality for mass spectrometry [2]. The dawn of nanofabrication techniques enabled the development of (i) a nano-machined artificial gland for the dissipation of sex pheromones originating from Spodoptera littoralis as a biomimetic infochemical communication system [3], and (ii) an evaporative sample concentrator featuring a perforated membrane of 180nm thickness for a water quality monitoring system [4]. Despite all the benefits of silicon micromachining, the proliferation of this technology has been limited by its high unit cost and fabrication labor requirements. While attempts have been made to replace silicon with polymers such as PDMS, cyclic olefin copolymer, and thermoplastics, many unsolved issues remained. The introduction of 3D-printing techniques gave momentum to the microfluidics field and shifted the design paradigm. A sample concentration system based on a 3D-printed microfluidic circuit board was created [5] in which some microfluidic components were manufactured by rapid prototyping. Secondly, the author will exhibit a fully 3D-printed water quality monitoring system [6] and will discuss the pros and cons of 3D-printing in relation to alternative rapid prototyping techniques.

Keynote Forum

Chen Lai

Shenzhen Institute Peking University, China

Keynote: Novel mesh based on nano bacterial cellulose and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) composite

Time :

Biography:

Chen Lai received her PhD from Hunan University for studies on biomaterials. She is Vice director of biomedical engineering center in Shenzhen institute Peking University, with responsibility for research activities on bacterial nano-cellulose (BC). Major research areas are BC modification and its clinical applications

Abstract:

The current study was designed to evaluate and directly compare the biomechanics and biocompatibiltiy properties of the novel bacterial cellulose (BC) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/BC composite meshes. Composite mesh was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), demonstrating that PLGA only adheres to the BC surface. Laser perforation generated isotropic, flat and stable structures that prevented deformation under pressure and reduced the risk of potential bacterial colonization. In contrast to the pure BC mesh, the results of the in vitro study, which involved protein adsorption and cell-material interaction, suggested that composite mesh preferentially adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) and enhanced the expression of type I collagen in fibroblasts. PLGA/BC mesh caused less inflammation and was surrounded by newly formed connective tissue composed of type I collagen after implantation in a rabbit model for one week, demonstrating that the novel mesh is fully biocompatible and can integrate into surrounding tissues. From this study, PLGA/BC mesh may prove to be a viable clinical alternative to existing materials.

  • Classification of Smart Materials |Smart Structures and Materials | Smart Materials using Nano-technology | Robotics and Future | Shape Memory Alloys | Automation and Impact
Location: Osaka

Session Introduction

Jalal Akbari

University of Malayer, Iran

Title: Multiple damage detection in frames using wavelet transforms
Speaker
Biography:

Jalal is Assistant Professor of civil engineering at Malayer University from September 2008. He spent about one-year (2006-2007) as a research scholar at University of Florida (UF) in USA. He graduated with Ph.D. from Tarbait Modares University (TMU) in 2008 in Tehran. He received M.Sc degree in the civil engineering field (IUST) in 2002 in Tehran. He got B.Sc degree in the civil engineering field from Bu-Ali Sina University in 1999 in Hamedan.

Abstract:

Wavelet transforms are convenient tools in the structural health monitoring and damage detection fields. However, these methods have encountered some limitations in practical usage. Thus, signal energy analysis was also used as an alternative technique for damage detection. In this research, firstly, comparison between the wavelet and signal energy methods for frame type structures with different support conditions and multiple damage scenarios has been conducted. Then, Discrete Wavelet transforms (DWT) and Teager energy operator (TEO) have been applied on the curvature of mode shapes of the beams, and the locations of the damages have been identified. The results show that in compare with discrete wavelet transform signal energy operator has preference. This superiority in detecting the damages, especially near the supports of the beam, is obvious, and contains enough sensitivities in low damage intensities. Additionally, the damage detection in the cases that the response data is noisy has been investigated. For this purpose, by adding low intensity noises to the curvature of the mode shapes, the abilities of mentioned methods have been evaluated. The results indicate that each method is not individually efficient in recognizing damages in noisy condition, but the combination of them under noisy conditions is more reliable.

Speaker
Biography:

Hyoung-Joon Jin is a Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering in Inha University (Incheon, South Korea), where he received the Ph.D. degree (2000), Master's degree (1996) and B.A. (1994). From 2001 to 2003, he was a postdoctoral Fellow of Chemical & Biological Engineering in Tufts University (USA), where he started to work in the field of natural polymers for medical applications. His main research interests are currently in nanostructured carbons for energy storage and conversion, and nanofabrication of polymeric materials and biopolymers, especially silk fibroins and bacterial celluloses, for electronic devices.
 

Abstract:

Silk is natural structured material composed of mainly two kinds of amino acids, glycine and alanine up to 80%, resulting in the highly conserved repeat units such as poly-(Gly-Ala) and poly-Ala domains. These repetitive peptide domains promote the polypeptides to construct the β-sheet conformations by numerous inter-/intra-hydrogen bonds, the most stable secondary structure in proteins. And the parallel alignment of these strong β-sheet crystals along the fibre axis results in mechanical robustness and chemical stability of silk. Moreover, the β-sheet crystals are not burned out even after pyrolysis and restructured to form unsaturated or aromatic structures by heating above 350 °C. And by further heating by 2,800 °C, they developed into pseudo-graphitic structures. However, although the exceptional theoretical modulus and strength of graphite up to ~1 TPa and ~120 GPa, respectively, the silk-derived fibres with disordered graphitic structures possess poor mechanical properties even hard to measure. Here, I demonstrated that a long-range ordered graphitic structure along the fibre axis can be realized from the inherent microstructure of silk through simple heating with axial stretching. The hexagonal carbon layers, pyroproteins, induced from the β-sheet protein molecules maintain the parallel alignment along the fibre axis and were developed into highly ordered sp2 carbon structure by further heating up to 2,800 °C, resulting in the remarkable tensile strength and Young’s modulus up to ~2.5 GPa and ~450 GPa, respectively. Considering that in the early development stage, the carbon fibres produced from the conventional precursor, polyacrylonitrile, revealed only ~ 1GPa and ~100 GPa of tensile strength and Young’s modulus, respectively, these pyroprotein-based fibres prepared with a facile process show a great potential to surpass the strongest fibres available today. And the lightweight and physicochemical-/thermo-stable characteristics compared with traditional inorganic materials provide them with extensive applications in aero-space, automobile, and civil engineering. In addition, the bio-derived fibres consisting of the large conjugated aromatic domains reveal the high electrical conductivity up to 4.37 × 103 S/cm, expanding their application fields to the high-technology industries such as energy storage/conversion system, e-textile, robotics, bio-electronics, and bio-medicals.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Daniel (Dan) Li has participated in a wide variety of both basic and clinical research regarding biomaterials in the context of orthopaedic applications, such as the use of hydrogels as a novel drug-eluting mechanism to combat osteomyelitis and tuberculosis infection. He has spent significant time overseas with the orthopaedics department at the 309th Hospital of the PLA in Beijing, China, working under the team of Dr. Yuanzheng Ma, as well as completing his undergraduate degree in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois. There, he conducted research under the John Rogers Research Group investigating novel biodegradable electronics. Currently, he is performing clinical outcomes research at Northwestern University regarding the evaluation of prosthetic joint infection.

Abstract:

3D Printing aims to deliver intricate biomedical devices based upon advanced diagnostic imaging. With the current upsurge in public interest and increasing access to low-cost printers, efforts are underway to produce patient-specific anatomical models, customized implants, and individualized instrumentation. Examples include the development of disposable surgical saw guides and cutting blocks in total knee arthroplasty. These devices help minimize tissue loss and optimize the native biomechanics of the patient. This review explores the evolution of 3D Printing technology in the context of biomaterials. It also aims to critiques the major challenges ahead in optimizing bioinks and biologic performance in bringing 3D bioprinting to clinical practice. Common materials include metals, bioceramics, synthetics, and natural polymers; each have specific mechanical properties, processing methodology, and cell-material interaction. Biofunctional biomaterials are an emerging class of materials that display adaptability and activity at every phase of bone growth. These biomaterials have been shown to promote osteogenic differentiation, improve calcium phosphate (CaP) precipitation, and regulate osteoblast gene expression. When crafted to emulate the specific micro-environment of bone, polymer-surface modifications accelerate bony ingrowth. 3D printing holds promise as a scaffold for bone regeneration as precise control of the overall geometry and internal porous structure. The accompanying biomaterials may be successfully embedded within multi-cellular co-cultures and specific growth factors modulated to optimize growth and fixation [2, 6]. Bioceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate, and bioglass, are osteogenic and promote cell proliferation, though they have been shown to lack appropriate mechanical strength. Composite scaffolds of HA and tricalcium phosphate and polycaprolactone (PCL)-HA with carbon backbones have been investigated to optimize biocompatibility and architecture to improve the porosity and mechanical strength of these constructs. Furthermore, microscale manipulation of biomaterials allow for integration of antimicrobial properties to combat infection.

  • Properties and Characterization of Smart Materials | Smart Materials in Medical Sciences | Actuators and Sensors as Smart Materials | Smart Textiles in Clothing | Smart Materials in Global Market | Applications of Smart Materials
Location: Osaka
Speaker
Biography:

Bamidele Lawrence Bayode is currently doing his PhD degree at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. His field of study includes the spark plasma sintering (SPS) fabrication, characterization and optimization of functional properties of Ti-based high temperature shape memory alloys. The SPS is a relatively novel fabrication technique for fabrication of novel advanced materials with tailor made properties, and since the development of Ti-based shape memory alloys is still on the rise, he has therefore decided to employ the use of the novel SPS technique to investigate the various technical possibilities that Ti-Ta and Ti-Zr based shape memory alloys possess.
 

Abstract:

Ti-Ta and Ti-Zr alloys have been identified to possess capabilities to meet the demand for light weight, commercially friendly and functionally viable high temperature shape memory applications in the aerospace industries. Characterization is at the core of understanding the phenomenological relationship between the processing method and the final materials properties. In contrast to the preponderance of reported work on the characterization of shape memory alloys fabricated from conventional techniques, not much work involving the uses of spark plasma sintering is available. In this study, Ti-30Ta and Ti-30Zr based alloys have been fabricated from elemental powders, using spark plasma sintering under varying process parameters including: sintering time, sintering pressure and powder formulations. As sintered powders were characterized for their relative density, and indentation microhardness using Archimedes buoyancy method and Vickers indentation techniques respectively. Metallographically prepared specimens were subjected to microstructural and chemical analyses using Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) respectively. Crystallographic properties were also determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The thermal properties of the sintered alloys were also determined using laser flash analyses and differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructural results showed improved twinned martensite plate formation with increase in at%Zr content as shown in Fig 1. Furthermore, Ta was found to stabilize beta phase in Ti while the Zr stabilize the alpha phase. Almost full densification was achieved with increase in the Zr content.

Speaker
Biography:

Juan Carlos is a passionate engineer who has +5 years of experience in additive manufacturing and 11 years as a mechanical engineer. His experience involves R&D of additive manufacturing processes and product design in metal 3D printers, stereolithography and most recently on DLP printers . On the research area, he has developed and tested different metal alloys to allow them to be compatible and achieve required mechanical and metallurgical properties using direct metal deposition. On DLP printers he is currently testing different resins to achieve required mechanical properties.  He earned the degree of Master in Science from the University of Manchester in Advanced Manufacturing Technology and Systems Management in 2011, with a dissertation titled “Low power wire feeding laser additive manufacture. In 2006, he graduated from a B.S. in Mechanical engineering with a minor in electrical engineering from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education.
 

Abstract:

As any other manufacturing technology that transforms a raw material into a final product, additive manufacturing technologies requires energy sources and materials usage that will define how efficient their process can be. This research is meant to give an approach on the efficiency of major production additive manufacturing technologies with an overview in hardware, material consumption and 3D products. These major production technologies are powder beds (metals and plastics), photopolimerization (SLA and DLP) and direct energy deposition (metals). 
 

Speaker
Biography:

Vilkov Aleksandr has his expertise in developing mechatronics, automation and robotics system and modules. That expertise helps him working at AEROELECTROMASH and at SuperOX LLC Japan. In 2016 graduated as specialist/master degree in engineering in BMSTU (Bauman Moscow State Technical University). 

Abstract:

Nowadays humanity use robotics technologies in numerous ways. Some of them help disable people, some of them helping in daily life. Robotics manipulators have different ways to use in industry and for helping people. Mostly researches for helping disable people and improve production in a factory. Could we use in manipulators in one more way? Yes. Disable people can control their bionic arm by the muscle or their brain. At University of Pittsburg School of Medicine Adrew Schwartz help Nathan Copeland to control robotic arm by his brain and demonstrate his technology. Now we can apply these technologies for people who working in high risk works. For example: in space exploration. Astronaut could control one more arm by his brain to improve his productivity and reduce his fatigue or holding by ISS. For future colonists it becomes useful as well. Researches in AI field also could be applied for future projects. Probes which landing on the celestial body’s surface with AI on board could help in explore unknown worlds and their environment. It means that we not needed put people in risk in order to explore new worlds, but still robots cannot replace human in 100%. Now we can use both technologies added computer vision and we get unlimited sub virtual presence human being at the surface of celestial body. He still able to influence of environment by his will, can touch what he found interesting and robot help him in orientation on the surface to avoid obstacles and ravines.  It can be combining with robots of Boston Dynamics. Robots which help you in a daily life and on which you have full control await us in a future.
 

Shivam Nigam

Hindustan Zinc, India

Title: Tapping the unlimited energy
Speaker
Biography:

Shivam Nigam is working as Process Engineer at Hindustan Zinc, India

Abstract:

Sun is the primary source of energy and has always been the only energy source for life. Life has sustained itself on solar energy since the beginning. So, as of now, we can look up to the sun for fighting the inevitable energy crisis for at least next millennium. One hour of solar energy received by the earth is enough for the entire human race for a year at the current consumption rate. Here, we are going to see how solar energy can be a viable and easy option for humans. It started with the discovery of photoelectric effect and now we are using that to achieve around 40% efficiency in solar cells. This presentation is about recent advancements, trends and future perspectives in Solar and concentrator technologies i.e. tapping the unlimited energy. High-cost solar cell area was the major reason behind its inapplicability, but it was solved by compensating it with a concentrating system. Thus Concentrated Photo-Voltaic (CPV) systems are one of the most researched topics. The performance of PV systems widely depends upon geometrical accuracy, material selection and number of Band-gaps it is compatible with. For that, we will also look into different materials for various systems and requirements. Holographic concentrators are also discussed with Laterally Arranged Multiple Band-gap (LAMB) solar cells. LAMB technology is under development. Other indirect methods are also developed simultaneously in the form of solid-state Thermo-Electric Generators (TEG). In TEGs most recent is Na-TECC. Na-TECC stands for Sodium Thermo-Electro-Chemical converter. Moreover, these systems are also capable of using waste heat from other systems apart from the sun like Biogas combustion and give up to 40-45% of conversion efficiency. One more alternative method which is an emerging field is the use of Rectenna for energy conversion. This utilizes light waves instead of photons for energy conversion. Currently, only around 1% efficiency is reported as it is in an initial stage. This presentation discusses the aforementioned technologies, materials, their efficiency and their future scope.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Dan Cohen

Informatix, Israel

Keynote: Slow Positron facility (SPOT)

Time :

Biography:

Dan Cohen is working as CSO at Informatix, Israel.

Abstract:

A slow positron beam is been built at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Slow Positron facility (SPOT). In Israel, the beam will introduce a new tool for both fundamental and applied research, and also will be one of the first slow positron beams in the world which are industry oriented, hence the special design. Here we present the design process of the beam, where the leading goals are safety and high efficiency, with a flexible choice of the positron source. The challenges in the design of a moderator unit, planned to utilize frozen gas in a conical geometry, with replicable positron source, the pre-accelerator section and the full beam-line were addressed by various simulation programs. First positron transport measurements in SPOT are being held and a fully operating facility is expected within a year. We believe this tool will open new horizons for smart materials understanding and quality assurance while manufacturing them.

Biography:

Moloud Abdar received the bachelor's degree in computer engineering from Damghan University, Iran, in 2015 and the master’s degree in computer science and engineering from the University of Aizu, Aizu, Japan, in 2018. He has several papers about data mining, machine learning, and user modeling in some refereed international journals and conferences. His research interests include data mining, artificial intelligence, machine learning, social media, big data, and human-centered computing. He is a member of International Association of Engineers. He is also very active in five international conferences and some referred international journals, including the Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, the Future Generation Computer Systems, the IEEE ACCESS, the Neurocomputing, the Journal of Internet Technology, the International Journal of Social and Humanistic, and the Web Intelligence as a Reviewer.
 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In recent decades, Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a very useful and powerful technology which has helped to improve the quality of people's lives worldwide. Machine learning (ML) is an especial branch of AI to apply various algorithms which can provide smarter AI-based products. These algorithms have been successfully applied on different subjects. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which includes several types) as the leading cause of death around the globe. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most important types of CVDs. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is one of the well-known evolutionary algorithms (EAs) which can be used for different purposes. Therefore, a modified and optimized PSO was applied on the Cleveland heart data with 303 records. The PSO algorithm, therefore, was used for producing different rules in heart disease from original data set and then optimization of these rules and producing the best rules using PSO algorithm. In other words, first random rules were generated and then were optimized using proposed PSO. Moreover, C4.5 decision tree algorithm was also applied to check its performance with proposed PSO. Findings: The results showed that the proposed PSO can optimize the generated rules significantly. Moreover, the findings demonstrated that the fitness function applied in our research has valuable impact on the performance of PSO. In addition, the optimized rules by PSO had better prediction accuracy compared with C4.5 algorithm. Conclusion & Significance: Classical PSO can generate different simple rules, however, optimized PSO can be more efficient to show higher accuracy. Moreover, this optimization technique can be used on different clinical and non-clinical data sets.  

  • Future Scope of Smart Materials |Carbon Fibre Reinforced Concrete ( CFRC )| Smart Combat Suits | Self-healing Hydro-gels | Electrostrictive Polymers for Energy Harvesting | Sun Exposure Monitoring Sensor
Location: Osaka
Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Abhishek has his expertise in carbon nanomaterials synthesis and its application in CFRP composites for structural applications. His new style of finding the importance of nanomaterials in CFRP composite and its interfacial interaction study has opened new pathways in aerospace industries. He has developed the new way of understanding the interface chemical bonding of CFRP composite and designing of new carbon nanomaterials for improved binding with carbon fiber and polymer. He has done master in chemistry with organic chemistry specialization from University of Delhi, India in 2013. Now, he is a Ph.D. research scholar in CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, India. He was a university football team member during his bachelor study in University of Delhi and also played for many Delhi football clubs.

Abstract:

Nowadays, various efforts are going on to improve electrical properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites to mitigate the problem associated with low electrical conductivity of epoxy resin based CFRP lighting striking application. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) incorporated into conducting polymer polyaniline (PANI), doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) with cross linker divinylbenzene (DVB) thermosetting polymer system. RGO was incorporated in different weight (0 to 0.5 wt.%) PANI based system to get PANI-DBSA/RGO-DVB nanocomposites. RGO incorporated PANI-DBSA/DVB nanocomposite was developed by compression moulding method. RGO was characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and XRD which confirmed the presence of some oxygen-based functional groups on surface and edges of RGO. It is observed that PANI-DSBA/DVB composite with 0.3 wt% RGO content shows significant improvement in flexural strength and modulus by 153% and 32% while electrical conductivity improved by 400%. Also, observed the improved thermal properties and stability of 0.3 wt% RGO incorporated PANI based nanocomposite. The significant increase in electrical conductivity is due to the improvement of electrical transport pathway and molecular level interaction between RGO and PANI-DBSA/DVB system. The storage modulus, glass transition temperature (Tg) and thermal stability are maximum in case of 0.3 wt% RGO incorporated PANI-DBSA/DVB nanocomposite. Interfacial bonding between RGO and PANI-DBSA/DVB polymer system is analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and it confirmed the formation of H-bonding and π-π interaction between reinforcing constituents which agrees with HRTEM studies of PANI/RGO interface. Thus, RGO is constructive for improving the thermo-mechanical and electrical properties of PANI based system which can be used for development of conducting CFRP for different applications.